Tags: "Public Finance"

Blogs

Pensions: Assessing the cost of auto-enrolment delay

Pensions: Assessing the cost of auto-enrolment delay

Just occasionally, it is possible to do a piece of research that tests very precisely the direction of public policy. Last week, the Strategic Society Centre published a major piece of quantitative research we undertook with the Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex. The research […]

December 12, 2011 ×

Blogs

An OBR for social care

An OBR for social care?

The English social care system is characterised by unmet need, excessive rationing by local authorities, over-burdened carers and families facing up to ‘catastrophic costs’. However, the resources required to fix these issues are relatively modest compared to the resources of the state, society and – in particular – the older […]

November 16, 2011 ×

Blogs

The Dilnot dilemma

The Dilnot dilemma

The summer is over. The party conference season is complete. What now for the long-term care funding reform agenda and the recommendations of the Dilnot Commission that emerged at the start of July?

October 12, 2011 ×

Blogs

Housing boost the rental reality

Housing boost: the rental reality

Today saw the publication of a report on the private rental sector by Sir Adrian Montague. Its central recommendation is to unleash institutional investment in ‘build-to-let’ properties – homes not designed for owning, but just for renting.

August 23, 2011 ×

Blogs

Care costs does the cap fit

Care costs: does the ‘cap’ fit?

With the August break approaching, it’s worthwhile reviewing where the long-term care funding reform agenda has arrived at, now that all concerned have had an opportunity to digest the recommendations of the Dilnot Commission on Funding of Care and Support.

July 27, 2011 ×

Blogs

Joined up care thinking

Joined-up care thinking

Attendance Allowance, the older people’s disability benefit, is one of those bits of public spending that tends to carry on quietly in the background. It costs £7 billion per year in England, reaches over a million people, but rarely pops up in political debate.

June 21, 2011 ×

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